New Jazz Arrivals Week Ending November 01, 2011

Featuring Tiny Review recs of:  Goran Kajfes, Miho Wada, Marc Copland & John Abercrombie, John Stowell & Christopher Woitach, Dave Liebman & Richie Beirach, Daniel Zamir, Ajejandro Florez & Tibagui, Nils Petter Molvaer, Randy Brecker, and Kenny Werner.

*****

The following is kinda copied from the weekly article I write for emusic.com, giving a rundown of mini-reviews of interesting jazz new releases.  I’ll post them once a week, adding some artwork and extra links and modifying the text a little bit.  When I write the mini-reviews initially, I’m under a serious time constraint, but now I’ve had time to listen more closely to the music and think about it, so some of the reviews will change, but some may not.  They were initially called “Jonah’s Jazz Picks”; the reason why is not a complicated story or a long one, but sufficiently banal to just overlook.

This was the second installment of my recs.

Let’s begin.

 

Goran Kajfes – X/Y

Goran Kajfes – “X”

This first album just blew me away.  Trumpeter Goran Kajfes lives two different lives… one as a creator of jazz from that golden axis of 60s world & 70s soul jazz, and the second as a modern soundscaper of Brian Eno and Bill Laswell ambient compositions.  The “X” portion of this album will take you back to a time of joyous music that embraces avant-garde boisterousness in the same hug as a disparate orchestra of ethnic instruments.

Goran Kajfes – “Y”

The “Y” portion of the album is all about the warm fuzz of synthesizers and plaintive cry of distant trumpet.  Somehow it all works together.  When I originally grabbed it, I figured I would treat them as separate albums as sometimes be in the mood to listen to just the “X” portion and other times the “Y”, but I’m pretty sure I haven’t yet broken them up into separate listening sessions.  Highly recommended.  On the Headspin Recordings label.

Sand Boogie by Goran Kajfes by Headspin Recordings
Perfect Temperature for Leaving Home, Pt 2 by Goran Kajfes by Headspin Recordings

Here’s a link to Goran’s site, where you can hear some of the music.

And here’s his myspace page, where you can hear more of the music.

Here’s a free download from the album at the AllAboutJazz site, courtesy of the artist.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Miho Wada – Para Ti

Miho Wada – “Para Ti”

Naming her style “Japanese Punk Jazz,” Miho Wada finds a way to make jazz flute sound both romantic and badass.  Performing and training with a diverse group of musicians like Nigel Kennedy, Buena Vista Social Club, and Iggy Pop (among others), Miho sounds to be developing a very distinctive and enjoyable voice.  On this EP, she takes us through a series of tunes that displays her love of Cuban music and that have plenty of drive without blunting her light touch.  If you prefer a proper full length album, you can pick up her 2010 release Postcards To Your Bed.  Very cool.

Here’s a link to Miho’s Bandcamp page, where you can hear music from the album.

Here’s a free download from the album at the AllAboutJazz site, courtesy of the artist.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Marc Copland & John Abercrombie – Speak To Me

Marc Copland & John Abercrombie – “Speak To Me”

Marc Copland (piano) and John Abercrombie (guitar) are universally recognized as two of the jazz masters on the scene today, and they do nothing on this album to tarnish their legacy.  Taking their time to express their thoughts musically, they create a serene ambiance that’s thoroughly engaging.  It’s an “A” & “B” conversation that the listener is made to feel entirely welcome sitting in on.  Released on the solid Pirouet Records label.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

John Stowell & Christopher Woitach – Ghost In the Corner

John Stowell & Christopher Woitach – “Ghost in the Corner”

Origin label vet John Stowell and fellow Pacific Northwest jazz vet Christopher Woitach bring their complementary guitar voices together to make a very intriguing album.  Reminiscent less of jazz and more along the lines of Bill Frisell’s The Willies Americana sound, John and Christopher create an album that evokes images of back porches on rainy days.  Should have plenty of appeal to jazz fans with a decent collection of Leo Kottke on their shelf.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Dave Liebman & Richie Beirach – Unspoken

Dave Liebman & Richie Beirach – “Unspoken”

Yet two more of the living jazz legends on the scene making an appearance in this column.  Dave Liebman (sax) and Richie Beirach (piano) have been collaborating for well over 30 years, dating back to their classic album Lookout Farm and then later to their formation of all-star ensemble QuestUnspoken is an album for the quiet moments after the city has gone to sleep and you’re still awake.  Hell, this album may even make a person feel like they’re being spoken to.  Album ends strong with the song “Hymn for Mom / Prayer for Michael.”  Released on OutNote Records.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Daniel Zamir – Missing Here

Daniel Zamir – “Missing Here”

Probably known initially for his albums recorded for John Zorn’s Tzadik label’s “Radical Jewish Culture” music series, Daniel Zamir has now struck out on his own, and he sounds to have done so with a confident voice.  Missing Here has a lyricism that extends an invitation difficult not to accept.  Backed by a strong ensemble featuring superman bassist Omer Avital, Daniel’s soprano sax has a warmth to it, even when the notes have some bite to them.  I’m pretty sure this album was actually released late last year, but self-producing music ain’t an easy business, so I’m not gonna penalize him for not being technically a “new release”, especially not with the music being this good.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Alejandro Florez & Tibagui – Malandanza

Alejandro Flores & Tibagui – “Malandanza”

Well, this is an interesting little find.  A mix of Colombian music and jazz, Tibagui adds Alejandro Florez’s guitar to create an intoxicating selection of tunes, sometimes languid, sometimes challenging, but genuinely enjoyable from first note to last.  Woodwinds, acoustic guitar, percussion, and bass.  Jazz fans of Diego Barber’s work should take note, and it should have some crossover appeal to fans of Calexico.  “Glass Dust” is a haunting tune that should probably be in everybody’s playlist, jazz and non-jazz fans alike.

Here’s a link to Alejandro’s site, where you can stream music from the album.

Here’s a free download from the album at the AllAboutJazz site, courtesy of the artist.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Nils Petter Molvaer – Baboon Moon

Nils Petter Molvaer – “Baboon Moon”

Known for his jazz experimentalism with electronics and his sparse airy sound, Nils Petter Molvaer adds to his solid discography with more of what’s gained him an avid following.  Dark textures, ominous percussion, and wavering sound effects highlight this atmospheric album.  Put out on the Thirsty Ear label, which puts it square on familiar ground for Indie fans.  Prior fans of Molvaer’s work on ECM will have nothing to worry about, you’ll be safe with this album for sure.

Here’s a free download from the album at the AllAboutJazz site, courtesy of the artist.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Randy Brecker with the Danish Radio Big Band – The Jazz Ballad Song Book

Randy Brecker & DR Big Band – “The Jazz Ballad Songbook”

Randy Brecker’s trumpet fits right in with the crowd, and creates some beautiful moments of lush sound that just fly right along.  For those of you hesitant to buy Brecker stuff based on his output during the eighties, hearing Brecker play in a modern jazz setting, especially with orchestration, is a joy to hear and proves his fans correct when they praise his musicality.  Great stuff here.  On the Half Note label.

Here’s a link to the album’s myspace page, where it can be streamed.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Kenny Werner with the Brussels Jazz Orchestra – Institute of Higher Learning

Kenny Werner & the BJO – “Institute of Higher Learning”

Kenny Werner is an outstanding musician and his discography should be explored by every jazz fan.  There are some disparate sounds throughout, as his sense of adventure and experimentation have taken him in different directions.  This album sees some of that, but keeps it in the ballpark of mainstream to make it an album that should appeal across jazz and non-jazz lines of demarcation.  On the Half Note label.

Teaser House of the Rising Sun Institute of Higher Learning by Brussels Jazz Orchestra

Here’s a link to Kenny’s site, where you can stream some of the album.

Here’s a link to the BJO’s myspace page, where there’s a whole lot of music to stream.

Here’s a link to emusic, where the album can be purchased.

 

Enjoy and see you next week!

 

Those were the highlights of the jazz albums that hit emusic for the week ending 11/01/11.

Cheers.

 

Here’s some language to protect emusic’s rights as the one to hire me originally to scour through the jazz new arrivals and write about the ones I like:

New Arrivals Jazz Picks“, courtesy of eMusic.com, Inc.
© 2011  eMusic.com, Inc.

My thanks to emusic for the freelance writing gig, the opportunity to use it in this blog, and the editorial freedom to help spread the word about cool new jazz being recorded today.

2 Responses to New Jazz Arrivals Week Ending November 01, 2011

  1. Kate says:

    Hi There!
    I really like your tiny reviews, they are great! I also really like your picture at the top. Great job.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>